word of the week: sidepole draping

Monday, August 15th, 2011

Unless you’re renting a sperry tent, which has really beautiful wooden poles that support the tent, you’ll likely have metal poles to contend with. Draping is one way to conceal unattractive metal poles. White chiffon-like draping is a classic choice, as in the first image below by Leo Patrone, but you can also go the custom route, matching draping to your tent decor, as in the second and third images.

 

tent-with-chandelierstent draping

 

1 – Leo Patrone Photography via Snippet & Ink; 2 – Alison Events photographed by Thayer Alyson Gowdy via Snippet & Ink; 3 – Blossoms Events

 

word of the week: cantina lights

Monday, July 18th, 2011

Cantina lights, which are tiny globe-like bulbs that you might associate with European cafes, can be hung in most any pattern or configuration you can dream. Also called cafe lights or bistro lights, these pretty string lights, require more labor (and time) to install than more standard forms of wedding lighting, so be prepared for higher costs, but they really do make tents and outdoor spaces sparkle!

 

 

images: Jose Villa via Snippet & Ink; Skyline Tent Company; Sarah Yates Photography via Once Wed

word of the week: seating chart

Monday, June 27th, 2011

If you’re having a seated dinner you will have both a floor plan diagram and a seating chart. Your planner, venue or caterer will likely draw your floor plan. Here’s one we drew recently for an event on the lawn at Maymont:

wedding floor plan diagram

Corresponding to the diagram is a seating chart, which details who is sitting where, tells us what meal they have ordered (if you’re offering choices), if they have meal restrictions, if they are children and any other important details servers should know (i.e. this person is the mother of the bride!).

We like to code seating charts in the “coding” column. Here green stands for allergy and orange stands for a child’s meal. But, if we were offering meal choices at this event, we would code guests (either by color or symbol) to signify entree choice. In that case, the coding on this sheet would match the coding on your guests’ place cards.

word of the week: first look

Monday, June 20th, 2011

Classic Richmond Wedding The Jefferson

First look photographs happen before the ceremony. They’re called “first look” because it is the first time you will see each other as bride and groom in your gown and suit. First look photographs are wonderful if you’re tight on time following the ceremony, or if you’d rather spend your time cocktailing rather than photographing. But, they’re nearly crucial during fall or winter months when the sun sets earlier. First look photos allow you to take advantage of natural light outdoors, rather than having to rely on artificial lighting to light your portraits indoors.

above: Ashley and Paul seeing each other for the first time at The Jefferson before their ceremony at University of Richmond. Photography by Don Mears.

word of the week: sidewalls

Monday, June 13th, 2011

If you’re planning an outdoor event, one of the first things you’ll probably do is secure your tent. You will likely hear a lot of words that are new to you when you’re selecting a tent. One of them might be sidewalls.

In case of bad weather, sidewalls are your friend. They protect you from wind and rain. If you look at the picture above, you’ll see clear walls surrounding the tent. Those are sidewalls. They’re versatile in that you can remove panels or add panels, so you’re not surrounded by walls all night long unless you need to be. Sidewalls come in many different materials. Clear walls are shown above, but you might have the option to order solid white, white with windows, mesh, etc.

In addition to sidewalls, you may want to consider other rain plan options for your tent: fans in case of hot weather or if you’re using sidewalls to keep air circulating, a cocktail hour tent (or more square footage in your dining tent as a rain plan), a ceremony tent, on-site event service from your tent company (a dedicated person from the tent company who can assist with sidewalls, etc.), flooring, and a marquee (a covered walkway) from your catering tent to your dining tent.

 

image courtesy skyline tent company

word of the week: table cards

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

escort cards

Table cards, also called escort cards, communicate one crucial piece of info: what table your guests are to sit at during dinner. They’re a must if you’re hosting a large seated dinner {i.e. more than one table} and should be displayed during cocktail hour.

If you’re doing a traditional tented card, the name goes on the outside and the table number goes on the inside; but if you’re doing a flat card, like in the example, the guest’s name would go on the front, while the table number would go on the back. There are lots of variations on table card design but be sure to include the guest’s name and the table number.

If you’re offering meal selections, a fish, beef or vegetarian option for instance, table cards deliver another key piece of info — what meal your guests will be having for dinner. On the outside of the card, you can communicate the guest’s meal choice to the server with a symbol, ribbon, or color of ink. You can also use a stamp set like this from paper source.

word of the week: chiavari

Monday, May 23rd, 2011

chiavari chair fall wedding

There are many types of chairs to choose from for your ceremony and reception. Today we’re highlighting the chiavari chair in our new Monday series, which introduces you to common words you’ll hear while planning your wedding. The chiavari chair takes its name from the coastal Italian town of Chivari, for which it is named.

Jackie Kennedy Wedding

A favorite of brides and first ladies alike, the chiavari chair is a classic that looks equally at home outdoors and in ballrooms. Light and easy to stack, the chiavari chair is as functional as it is pretty.

 

chiavari chairballroom chair

Also known as a ballroom chair, the chiavari chair is most commonly found in mahogony, natural wood, silver, gold and black. The two images above were taken by Liz Banfield and designed by Tara Guerard.

 

chiavari chairschiavari chairs

Depending on the market where you’re planning, you may be able to find chiavari chairs in colors as wild as magenta, spring green or clear lucite. Both of the tables above were designed by Eddie Ross — the first for an event at SCAD and the second, called modern mix, pictured here.

The chiavari chair is often twice as much as (if not slightly more) than the cost of a folding chair, which is another popular choice for events.

 

images: 1- photographed by Meg Smith via La Tavola; 2 pictured here and 3 via Martha Stewart Weddings photographed by Liz Banfield and designed by Tara GuerardKennedy Wedding via LIFE; SCAD event and modern mix by Eddie Ross