Southern Hospitality

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014


southern weddings

 

southern weddings hospitality

 

In addition to styling Janie Medley’s lovely feature in the latest Southern Weddings Magazine, the SW girls were kind enough to ask me to contribute to a story called “35 tips for a wedding full of southern hospitality.” Naturally, I wrote about something that’s near and dear to my heart — timing. No matter how beautiful the details, how sumptuous the linens, how striking the flowers, a thoughtfully crafted event day agenda is the foundation of your event; anticipating how your guests will experience each moment of your wedding day and crafting an experience with them in mind is one of the most generous expressions of hospitality!

 

the belly button trick

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

colorful fun wedding bouquet

One of the questions I’m asked most during rehearsals or just before ceremonies by a bride or maid who wants to make sure she’s getting it just right is, “how should I hold my bouquet?”. Just remember the belly button rule: hold your bouquet lower than you think it should be — usually at or around your belly button. Bouquets look best carried lower than you think they should be!

photo by Jodi Miller Photography; bouquet designed by Courtney Spencer of Merriment Events

family style dining, part two

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Gay offered such great insight into what it means to serve dinner “family style.” Here are a few technical things about this dinner style…

*Design your floor plan to match the service style. Nearly 250 guests attended Alex and Paul’s reception. Although that’s a large party, we really wanted the reception to feel intimate and for the focus to be on conversation and feasting! That was the entire point of serving dinner family style, after all. For that reason, we grouped tables end to end and created a u-shape around the dance floor. The table set-up facilitated conversation and passing of platters.

 

*Using escort cards and place cards are a must with this floor plan! Each table seated eight people, but with tables grouped end to end, some table groupings seated as many as 40 guests. When tables are grouped in this fashion, it is really important to number each table in the group (as shown below) and to offer both escort cards and place cards. Even though each table will be numbered, without place cards, it can be difficult for guests to discern where one table ends and another begins.

 

*Vary the look of the tables. To keep things interesting and to make sure the tables weren’t a sea of sameness, which could have easily happened with this many tables, we decided to seat guests at a mix of  linen covered tables and farm tables.

 

*Don’t forget to leave some room for platters! We really labored over how much decor to put on the tables. Because dinner was served on larger platters that were passed from guest to guest, we had to be mindful of leaving space on the table. Unlike a plated dinner service, where you could literally create a “runner” of floral down the center of the table, we had to be sure to leave some breaks. We also had to be mindful of budget — long tables can be more expensive to decorate. Ultimately, we decided to group jars of flowers in threes and spaced the groupings with hurricane candles. To add a little more sparkle to the table, we scattered tea lights.

 

photography by Don Mears

family style dining

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

I’m so happy to welcome Gay from A Pimento Catering in Charlottesville. I had the good fortune to work with Gay at our clients’, Alex and Paul, wedding last year at Maymont, and she has been gracious enough to stop by today to talk about family style dining, the style in which we served dinner at Alex and Paul’s wedding. Without further ado, I’ll turn it over to our guest now…

family style dining wedding

I am thrilled to share my experiences catering in the “family style.” I’ll make no secret of it: serving a dinner this way is my personal favorite approach, for lots of reasons. It’s definitely not for everyone, but for those who wish to enjoy a relaxed (not to mean informal, necessarily), gracious and more “home-y” meal, family style service – meaning that guests sit down for a meal which is presented on platters to be passed among them for self-service – is a perfect way to connect people, food and conversation.

We cater many weddings in the course of a year. Clients come to us with all manner of questions, ideas and, sometimes, challenges to overcome when planning a wedding. There are definitely many among us who feel that a plated dinner is the preferred approach to a wedding dinner. But for those who are exploring other ideas, I encourage you to consider this new, old-fashioned method of sharing a meal. I’ll highlight what I feel to be the plusses here, some of which are the perfect solution to challenges that may arise in deciding how to serve your guests a meal that all can enjoy.

Graciousness Most of us are fortunate enough to remember at least a few holiday or weekend meals when family and friends would gather around a table (a large table in my family!) to eat together. Remember the comfort you felt when you settled into a chair you knew you’d occupy for an easy while, unhurried? The pleasure of sharing a meal your host or hostess, or maybe even some of the guests prepared with care? What more perfect day to enjoy that feeling than your wedding day when (as I see it) a group of people you care specially for, a group of people likely never to be in one place together, like this, on any other day? Because the dishes are passed among guests, even those who have never met will speak to each other, connect, as they hand off the roasted root vegetables or bread.

Variety One challenge in planning a wedding meal is that the average wedding party includes a wide variety of personalities, tastes and dietary conditions. When serving a plated meal, the scope of what you serve is narrowed to what fits on a plate in a few courses – choice can be more challenging to offer. But with family-style service, one can offer more than one entrée and multiple sides – with a little creativity (who doesn’t love that?!) – and appease a wide spectrum of tastes.

Often we break up a meal and serve perhaps a pre-set, plated first course, a family-style main course and come back to a plated dessert. You can squeeze in a delicious cheese course, too, that guests can linger over at the end of a meal.

Beauty Many wedding guests find themselves seated at a round table of eight or ten guests. With family style service, you’re better off opening up and expanding your seating to larger groups of 12, 20 or more. That can be a great way to help unfamiliar guests connect and keep together large groups of family or friends that can one has to break up in smaller seatings. I love the conviviality among larger groups – conversation always seems larger, more open. These days many design and equipment rental companies keep larger tables to make this happen. Now many are renting wood-constructed, farm-style tables which I love especially, but not exclusively, in outdoor settings. They are décor in and of themselves. (…I have yet to see an unattractive farm table…)

And formality? No loss there. A family-style dinner need not mean less thorough or attentive service. Go ahead and pull out the china and crystal, too, if you like.

But one can just as easily create a less dressy table with things like wild flowers, second hand china and the likes. Or a more sleek look, with geometric or paper table runners or placemats, cool stemless glassware and textured china. The options are truly endless.

family style wedding

Cost Because of the choices open to you – food, décor, seating and mode/intensity of service – the cost can be quite variable, especially in terms of staffing and equipment rental. You’ll want to discuss all of your preferences and needs with your caterer or planner, including your budget (it’s a part of planning every event and they can serve you best when they know the parameters you’re working in).

Thank you so much for stopping by, Gay!

 

photography by Don Mears

*new* postage rates!

Monday, January 23rd, 2012

classic calligraphy invitation

Postage rates increased by a penny yesterday. Erika at Delphine assembled a handy cheat sheet for standard postage rates of common wedding mailings. Of course, you should always take all of the pieces of your invitation to the post office to be weighed before you purchase postage, just to be safe.

 

erika’s article via think splendid; invitations by the lettered olive photographed by katie stoops & styled by courtney spencer for southern weddings magazine

 

 

word of the week: seating chart

Monday, June 27th, 2011

If you’re having a seated dinner you will have both a floor plan diagram and a seating chart. Your planner, venue or caterer will likely draw your floor plan. Here’s one we drew recently for an event on the lawn at Maymont:

wedding floor plan diagram

Corresponding to the diagram is a seating chart, which details who is sitting where, tells us what meal they have ordered (if you’re offering choices), if they have meal restrictions, if they are children and any other important details servers should know (i.e. this person is the mother of the bride!).

We like to code seating charts in the “coding” column. Here green stands for allergy and orange stands for a child’s meal. But, if we were offering meal choices at this event, we would code guests (either by color or symbol) to signify entree choice. In that case, the coding on this sheet would match the coding on your guests’ place cards.

word of the week: first look

Monday, June 20th, 2011

Classic Richmond Wedding The Jefferson

First look photographs happen before the ceremony. They’re called “first look” because it is the first time you will see each other as bride and groom in your gown and suit. First look photographs are wonderful if you’re tight on time following the ceremony, or if you’d rather spend your time cocktailing rather than photographing. But, they’re nearly crucial during fall or winter months when the sun sets earlier. First look photos allow you to take advantage of natural light outdoors, rather than having to rely on artificial lighting to light your portraits indoors.

above: Ashley and Paul seeing each other for the first time at The Jefferson before their ceremony at University of Richmond. Photography by Don Mears.

word of the week: chiavari

Monday, May 23rd, 2011

chiavari chair fall wedding

There are many types of chairs to choose from for your ceremony and reception. Today we’re highlighting the chiavari chair in our new Monday series, which introduces you to common words you’ll hear while planning your wedding. The chiavari chair takes its name from the coastal Italian town of Chivari, for which it is named.

Jackie Kennedy Wedding

A favorite of brides and first ladies alike, the chiavari chair is a classic that looks equally at home outdoors and in ballrooms. Light and easy to stack, the chiavari chair is as functional as it is pretty.

 

chiavari chairballroom chair

Also known as a ballroom chair, the chiavari chair is most commonly found in mahogony, natural wood, silver, gold and black. The two images above were taken by Liz Banfield and designed by Tara Guerard.

 

chiavari chairschiavari chairs

Depending on the market where you’re planning, you may be able to find chiavari chairs in colors as wild as magenta, spring green or clear lucite. Both of the tables above were designed by Eddie Ross — the first for an event at SCAD and the second, called modern mix, pictured here.

The chiavari chair is often twice as much as (if not slightly more) than the cost of a folding chair, which is another popular choice for events.

 

images: 1- photographed by Meg Smith via La Tavola; 2 pictured here and 3 via Martha Stewart Weddings photographed by Liz Banfield and designed by Tara GuerardKennedy Wedding via LIFE; SCAD event and modern mix by Eddie Ross

 

Things I took away from the Royal Wedding

Friday, April 29th, 2011

In no certain order….

Gigantic boutonnières are a no. Please note how dapper and sophisticated Mr. Middleton looks with his diminutive boutonniere.

Royal Wedding_William Kate


Sleeves are always stunning, and surprisingly original, given how popular the strapless white wedding gown is.

Kate Middleton bride


Wedding parties look fabulous in white.

Pippa MIddleton Royal Wedding


You don’t always have to wear your hair up, despite what your mother might say. And, by your mother, I mean my mother. ; )

Kate Middleton wedding


Classic always wins: green and white flowers, lily of the valley, white wedding shoes, weddings with decorum, and on and on…you get the picture.

Royal Wedding Kate and William


And, other things, for which I don’t have pictures.

*Don’t rush your reading! If James Middleton can deliver a reading in front of the entire world without rushing, so too can you!

*Be on time! British punctuality warms my heart.

*Simplicity is elegance.

*Don’t raise your glass when people toast to you. Did you note that the Queen did not taking part in singing “God Save the Queen?” That’s because it was being sung to her.

Image 1 via Racked; Image 2 via The Telegraph; Image 3 via The Telegraph; Image 4 via Racked; Image 5 via The Telegraph

a pretty illustrative guide to setting a table….

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

how to set a table

by Amy Borrell via Kris Atomic